Rare Deep-Sea Squid Captured on Camera

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Deep-Sea Discovery: Rare Encounter with a Hooked Squid

A team of marine researchers with the Minderoo—UWA Deep Sea Research Centre recently had a fascinating encounter with a rare deep-sea hooked squid, known scientifically as Taningia danae. The unique incident took place approximately 3,281 feet (1 kilometer) below the ocean’s surface in the South Pacific, located north of the Samoan Passage

A Remarkable Observation

The team, equipped with baited cameras, captured incredible footage of the 30-inch-long (75 centimeter) squid in action. In an intriguing yet brief interaction, the squid mistook the camera arm for prey, grabbing onto it before swiftly retracting and disappearing into the depths of the ocean.

Alan Jamieson, the director of the research center, emphasized the significance of this live observation, stating that typical records of this species are usually from strandings, accidental bycatch, or from the stomach contents of whales. The rarity of encountering these animals alive makes each observation invaluable for gathering essential data on their geographic distribution, depth range, and behavior patterns.

Despite not being the largest squid species in the ocean, the deep-sea hooked squid boasts a distinctive feature: two large photophores on its arms. These photophores, which are the largest in the animal kingdom, serve as a form of bioluminescence. This unique adaptation aids the squid in disorienting its prey, a common predatory tactic among deep-sea creatures.

Unveiling the Mystery of the Deep

Heather Stewart, the chief scientist of the team, described the squid’s encounter with their camera, highlighting the creature’s attempt to startle the “prey” with its stunning bioluminescent display. The footage captured during this encounter reveals the squid flashing its photophores directly towards the camera before ultimately retreating without a meal.

Currently, the research vessel RV Dragon is in the final stages of a three-month-long expedition exploring the Nova Canton Trough in the Pacific Ocean. The primary focus of the research team is to investigate the unique life forms and underwater landscapes found between 1.86 miles (3 km) and 8 miles (12.87 km) beneath the ocean’s surface.

With the recent sighting of the rare deep-sea hooked squid at less than a mile below the surface, the researchers are excited about the possibility of encountering more extraordinary and mysterious species lurking in the depths of the ocean. The exploration of these remote, deep-sea environments continues to unveil captivating secrets of the marine world.

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Chris Jones

Hey there! 👋 I'm Chris, 34 yo from Toronto (CA), I'm a journalist with a PhD in journalism and mass communication. For 5 years, I worked for some local publications as an envoy and reporter. Today, I work as 'content publisher' for InformOverload. 📰🌐 Passionate about global news, I cover a wide range of topics including technology, business, healthcare, sports, finance, and more. If you want to know more or interact with me, visit my social channels, or send me a message.
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